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6 COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT HPV (HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS) VACCINE

Q1: What is the difference between quadrivalent and 9-valent vaccines? A1: First of all, we must know that there are more than 100 strains of HPV in this world.  However, only some specific strains can cause cancer or anogenital warts.  The vaccines do not cover every strain of HPV. Vaccine type Quadrivalent (4vHPV) 9-Valent (9vHPV)…

Shingles vaccine

Zoster/shingles vaccine was licensed by the FDA in 2006. This vaccine reduces the risk of developing shingles by 51% and PHN by 67%. It is given in one dose as a shot, and can be given in a doctor’s office or pharmacy. Who Should Get Shingles Vaccine? People 60 years of age or older should…

Pneumococcal vaccine / Prevnar13 + Pneumovax23

Pneumococcal disease is common in young children, but older adults are at greatest risk of serious illness and death. There are 2 kinds of vaccines that help prevent pneumococcal disease Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine or PCV13 (Prevnar13) Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine or PPSV23 (Pneumovax23) Who Should Get Pneumococcal Vaccines? CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for all children younger…

Vaxigrip / Flu vaccine

What is the flu vaccine? An influenza vaccine is a vaccine given with a needle, usually in the arm. Seasonal influenza shots protect against the three or four influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the season. Vaxigrip tetra / Quadrivalent flu vaccines The quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine contain: Influenza A (H1N1):…

Hepatitis B vaccine

Why get vaccinated? Hepatitis B vaccine can prevent hepatitis B. Hepatitis B is a liver disease that can cause mild illness lasting a few weeks, or it can lead to a serious, lifelong illness. Acute hepatitis B infection is a short-term illness that can lead to fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, jaundice (yellow skin or eyes, dark…

HPV vaccine

Most cervical cancers are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection. Widespread immunization with the HPV vaccine could reduce the impact of cervical cancer worldwide. Here’s what you need to know about the HPV vaccine. What does the HPV vaccine do? Various strains of HPV spread through sexual contact and are associated with most cases of cervical cancer. Gardasil 4 is…

Pap and HPV tests

Pap tests (or Pap smears) look for cancers and precancers in the cervix. Precancers are cell changes that can be caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a sexually transmitted infection that goes away on its own in most people. If it does not go away, HPV can lead to cervical cancer. An HPV…

Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP)

What is PEP? PEP stands for post-exposure prophylaxis. The word “prophylaxis” means to prevent or control the spread of an infection or disease. PEP means taking HIV medicines within 72 hours after a possible exposure to HIV to prevent becoming infected with HIV. PEP should be used only in emergency situations. It is not meant for…

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

What is PrEP? PrEP stands for pre-exposure prophylaxis. The word “prophylaxis” means to prevent or control the spread of an infection or disease. PrEP is when people who don’t have HIV but who are at risk of getting HIV take HIV medicine every day to reduce their chances of HIV infection. If a person is…